Posts Tagged #debill

Letter to Lady Hermon re #debill debate April 6th 2010

Posted by on Thursday, 25 March, 2010

Dear Lady Hermon,

I read with interest that you will be standing as an independent at the upcoming election – I congratulate you on standing by your principles and wish you the best of luck!

With regards to the digital economy bill, it has been announced today that there will be a reading and debate held on the 6th April at which it is essential that the government are informed about how bad their plans are. The Open Rights group have a very interesting set of information for those without a direct knowledge of the bill located 
http://www.openrightsgroup.org/ourwork/reports/brief-on-digital-economy-bill 
and 
http://www.openrightsgroup.org/campaigns/disconnection/why-care 

I would be very glad to talk to you about the items listed above and I hope that you will be able to attend the reading and debate to lend your support to this very important campaign. For me, this is a very important issue and will shape how my vote will be cast in the upcoming election.

Yours sincerely,

Potential MPs in North Down & Green party & #debill

Posted by on Thursday, 11 March, 2010
I have made contact with all the potential members of parliament for North Down to be added their mailing lists. So far the only person to contact me back is Steven Agnew from the Green Party. I have asked him for his views on the #debill and received the below in response. It is great to see a party engaging with constituents and I found his views very interesting.

from Steven Agnew <Email Obfuscated>
sender time Sent at 14:26 (UTC). Current time there: 14:41. 
to Simon Whittaker <Email Obfuscatedt>
date 11 March 2010 14:26
subject RE: Digital Economy Bill
hide details 14:26 (14 minutes ago) 
 
Hi Simon,

 I know a number of genuine musicians who are against this type of legislation.  Artists want their music to be heard, record companies want to make money.

 I think that a site like Spotify strikes the right kind of balance but I accept the points in your letter to Sylvia Hermon; that there is a problem of transferring music between different formats and issues around sharing music which is very much part of the music culture.  I myself still make mix tapes but then I have always been a bit of a technophobe.

 There’s no doubt that the internet has revolutionised how we listen to music and is a threat to the big labels which can only be a good thing for genuine music fans.  Indie labels are more able to adapt and move with the times.

 Hope this gives you an idea of my own personal views.

 Cheers,

 Steven.

Steven Agnew
Research Officer
Green Party in Northern Ireland

Room 253, Parliament Buildings, Stormont, Belfast, BT4 3XX.
  
www.greenpartyni.org

 

More #debill letters

Posted by on Tuesday, 2 March, 2010

Having read this link
http://www.openrightsgroup.org/blog/2010/lib-dems-seek-web-blocking I
have contacted the Lords concerned with the following thoughts:


Dear Lord ???,

I have been following with great interest the passage of the digital
economy bill through the house of lords and have enjoyed watching the
debates on BBC democracy live and the accompanying conversation on
twitter(http://search.twitter.com/?q=debill). I have been impressed
with the fight against some of the motions put forward by the
government and I hope that this continues. The measures in the bill
regarding disconnection, mandatory blocking of a free/open internet and
abuse of photographers copyright are dreadful from a technical, legal
and moral perspective. The rights of individuals are being trodden on
by a government obsessed with control.
I have been made aware that there is an amendment due to be tabled in
the morning which will allow entire sites to be blocked if they are
accused of infringing
copyright(http://www.openrightsgroup.org/blog/2010/lib-dems-seek-web-blocking ).
In my view this gives the government of the day frankly Orwellian
control over what we are allowed to see, use & do on the internet. In
my view it is a bad amendment to a bad bill and should not be suggested
to a government which has too much power already.

I hope you will consider this before the debate on Wednesday and I will
be watching with interest.

Yours sincerely,

Letter to Lady Hermon #3strikes #digitaleconomy

Posted by on Saturday, 9 January, 2010

I’m supposed to be hoovering this morning but just got a letter from
my MP with a response to the questions I had passed on to her about
the Digital Economy Bill and wanted to get it answered. It is a fairly
comprehensive letter but excludes some key points which I hope I have
raised below.

Dear Lady Hermon,

Thank you very much for your letter dated 4th December 2009 which I
have just received. I have a few points I would like to raise from the
letter you made available to me from Stephen Timms.

1/ Mr Timms mentions a court order being required for providing
information and for cutting off the internet connection, it is my
understanding that this is not the case. I believe the bill allows for
rights holders to contact the ISP directly to obtain this information
and then obtain the cut off. I would very much appreciate some further
information on how these 2 measures would be enacted. I would also
like to see criminal acts being tried in the courts as all other
criminal acts are – not carried out in a tribunal at the behest of a
corporation.

2/ I am concerned about the court action which would take place, so
far those people accused of downloading illegal material are fined as
if each illegal download would have been a purchase – this is quite
frankly ridiculous. I would like to find some information about the
monetary punishments which could be put in place.

3/ The appeals process, I would like to obtain more information about
this item. Surely, if someone has been to court to have their guilt
proven then the appeal is through those same courts – why would there
be any need for an “independent” tribunal? If the tribunal is
required, who would sit on it? Would it have legal powers? Would it
contain any members of the recording industry for instance?

4/ The reserve power to amend the copyright, design & patent act. It
strikes me that this is nothing more than getting rid of the
requirement for laws to be put properly through parliament. Why is
this necessary? If technology changes then change the law accordingly
through the proper process – this amount of power is dangerous in the
hands of any government(power corrupts etc).

5/ While I very much agree that the legitimate download mechanisms are
improving and are a useful tool(I am a premium spotify subscriber and
use it regularly) I am also concerned that this is restricting users
even more. People like to own music and pass it down to their children
etc – the rise of excessive DRM makes this almost impossible. I have
recently switched from iphone to an android phone and have been unable
to take the majority of my songs with me – I have already bought them
so why should I now re-buy them in a different format? Could this be
where some of the illegal download figures are coming from? This also
goes for my e-books and audiobooks, I am sick and tired of forking out
for the same thing.

I find this governments lack of vision in technology quite disturbing
and would urge you to consider carefully the points made above.

Yours sincerely,

Simon Whittaker

Open rights group and net disconnection(aka mandy and geffen up a tree, k.i.s.s.i.n.g

Posted by on Tuesday, 17 November, 2009
I received this email from open rights group and wanted to share it, am not convinced that a phone call is the way forward but will be writing to my mp with a similar message using www.writetothem.com


Next week, plans to disconnect music fans who download music illegally

will be introduced by the government, as part of their Digital Economy
bill.

This plan won’t stop copyright infringement and with a simple
accusation could see you and your family disconnected from the
internet – unable to engage in everyday activities like shopping and
socialising.

Call your MP today on 020 7219 3000 and tell them this simple message
– ‘if you vote for disconnecting net users, that may change how I vote’.

We have a few days to show this (and any future) government that they
can’t mess with the internet – just ask the 600,000 people recently
blocked access to their Xbox live accounts. Any of us could easily be
next. ‘If you vote for disconnecting net users, I will vote against
your party at the next election’.

The message is simple – MPs now need to decide how much they need YOUR
vote. Please call 020 7219 3000 today and once you have made the call
update us here to tell us if your MP cares about keeping your vote.

http://www.openrightsgroup.org/campaigns/disconnection

Open rights group and net disconnection(AKA Mandy luvs geffen)

Posted by on Tuesday, 17 November, 2009
I received this email from open rights group and wanted to share it, am not convinced that a phone call is the way forward but will be writing to my mp with a similar message using www.writetothem.com


Next week, plans to disconnect music fans who download music illegally
will be introduced by the government, as part of their Digital Economy
bill.

This plan won’t stop copyright infringement and with a simple
accusation could see you and your family disconnected from the
internet – unable to engage in everyday activities like shopping and
socialising.

Call your MP today on 020 7219 3000 and tell them this simple message
– ‘if you vote for disconnecting net users, that may change how I vote’.

We have a few days to show this (and any future) government that they
can’t mess with the internet – just ask the 600,000 people recently
blocked access to their Xbox live accounts. Any of us could easily be
next. ‘If you vote for disconnecting net users, I will vote against
your party at the next election’.

The message is simple – MPs now need to decide how much they need YOUR
vote. Please call 020 7219 3000 today and once you have made the call
update us here to tell us if your MP cares about keeping your vote.

http://www.openrightsgroup.org/campaigns/disconnection